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HHRI Media Coverage – 2022

HHRI Media Coverage – 2022

2022

December

Flu-related hospitalizations declined for the second straight week in Minnesota, offering hope that an influenza season that started early will also end early. While 2,601 patients have been hospitalized for flu already this season — nearly tripling the total in the last two seasons combined — there were only 264 such cases in Minnesota in the week ending Dec. 17. That preliminary total is down from 400 the prior week and nearly 600 in the week before that, according to Thursday's state influenza update. State health leaders said they aren't taking chances, urging vaccinations and vigilance as Minnesota reaches the germ-mixing holiday season. Even in a typical influenza season, an initial wave of infections caused by A strains of the virus in January and February is followed by a second but smaller B-strain wave. A brief issued this week by the Minnesota EHR Consortium, a data analysis partnership of the state's largest hospital systems, found that the state is on track for its worst flu season in seven years, and possibly the last 50 years. "It's not unprecedented to have two separate increases," said Peter Bodurtha, a data scientist at Hennepin Healthcare Research Institute, a partner in the consortium. "It really depends on what happens the rest of the year. But being this far ahead of the curve this early, with this much of the season left, that's not a good position to be in." Flu levels were suppressed the past two years by COVID-19 and the public health response to the pandemic, including social distancing and mask wearing. Flu has re-emerged this year in the absence of those practices — and with only steady levels of COVID-19 rather than a wintertime surge.

Read the story on Star Tribune.

Among patients with kidney failure who successfully used a permanent access for hemodialysis, the incidence of patency loss was higher with arteriovenous graft use compared with arteriovenous fistula, according to data in Kidney Medicine. “The results suggest that, among patients with a functioning permanent access, arteriovenous fistulas have superior patency compared to arteriovenous grafts, particularly in terms of (primary) assisted patency and secondary patency,” Nicholas S. Roetker, PhD, MS, from the Chronic Kidney Disease Research Group at Hennepin Healthcare Research Institute in Minnesota, and colleagues wrote. Researchers derived data from the U.S. Renal Data System (2010 to 2015). There was a 3-year follow-up. Primary outcomes included loss of primary unassisted patency, loss of primary assisted patency and loss of secondary patency. Statistical analysis included incidence curves and HRs adjusted for clinical and sociodemographic factors.

Hennepin Healthcare developed a pain treatment map in partnership with the Minnesota Department of Health that will make it easier for Minnesotans experiencing chronic pain to find safe, opioid-free treatments, to help with healing, working, socializing, and managing daily tasks. Minnesota is now the first state in the country to map out a network of treatments that do not involve narcotics.

Read and watch the story on KSTP.

November

According to a new study, children exposed to parental incarceration had worse access to primary care and more unmet dental and mental health care needs than their peers, even after accounting for income, insurance status, rurality, and other important factors. With the United States having the highest incarceration rate in the world, these barriers currently place more than 5 million children who have experience the incarceration of a parent at risk of worse mental and physical health outcomes because of poor access to early health interventions. The study was published in Academic Pediatrics and authored by Drs. Rohan Khazanchi, Nia Heard-Garris, and Dr. Tyler Winkelman from Boston Children’s Hospital/Boston Medical Center, Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago, and Hennepin Healthcare, respectively. The researchers evaluated the relationships between having an incarcerated parent and health care use and access throughout childhood and adolescence. “While children and adolescents are living with their other parent or caregiver, parental incarceration can disrupt access to care for them through the loss of health insurance and fewer caregivers to help with responsibilities like routine healthcare visits,” explains Dr. Winkelman, the senior author of the study.

 
 

During the COVID-19 pandemic, transplantation of COVID-19 infected deceased donor kidneys gradually increased from 2020 to 2021 in the United States, before spiking in the first quarter of 2022, investigators revealed at Kidney Week 2022, the annual meeting of the American Society of Nephrology, in Orlando, Florida. Recipients of COVID-19 positive donor kidneys had no worse graft outcomes than other recipients. A total of 1731 (67.7%) COVID-19 positive kidneys were transplanted, 714 (27.9%) were recovered but not transplanted, and 108 (4.2%) were not recovered at all, Warren McKinney, PhD, of Hennepin Healthcare Research Institute, University of Minnesota in Minneapolis reported on behalf of his team. Yet the risks for all-cause graft failure and death did not differ significantly between recipients of COVID-19 positive vs negative donor kidneys, he stated. Cold ischemia times were longer for COVID-19 positive kidneys, however. The team did not examine rates of delayed graft function. He told Renal & Urology News that “high discard rates for COVID-positive donors and greater cold ischemic times may suggest that such donor kidneys remain difficult to place. Patient- and transplant program-level interventions targeting decision support and risk aversion may be necessary to reduce discard rates for COVID-positive donor kidneys.” Co-investigator and Hennepin Healthcare Research Institute President, Ajay Israni, MD, MS, added: “Nephrologists should assure transplant candidates that a COVID-19 positive donor kidney can be acceptable. Patients should learn about the transplant center’s criteria for accepting COVID-19 positive donor kidneys at the time of listing, so that they’re not processing this information for the first time at kidney offering, when a rapid response is needed.”

 
 

According to a new study, children exposed to parental incarceration had worse access to primary care and more unmet dental and mental health care needs than their peers, even after accounting for income, insurance status, rurality, and other important factors. With the United States having the highest incarceration rate in the world, these barriers currently place more than 5 million children who have experience the incarceration of a parent at risk of worse mental and physical health outcomes because of poor access to early health interventions. The study was published in Academic Pediatrics and authored by Drs. Rohan KhazanchiNia Heard-Garris, and Dr. Tyler Winkelman from Boston Children’s Hospital/Boston Medical Center, Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago, and Hennepin Healthcare, respectively. The researchers evaluated the relationships between having an incarcerated parent and health care use and access throughout childhood and adolescence. “While children and adolescents are living with their other parent or caregiver, parental incarceration can disrupt access to care for them through the loss of health insurance and fewer caregivers to help with responsibilities like routine healthcare visits,” explains Dr. Winkelman, the senior author of the study.

 
 

According to a new study, children exposed to parental incarceration had worse access to primary care and more unmet dental and mental health care needs than their peers, even after accounting for income, insurance status, rurality, and other important factors. With the United States having the highest incarceration rate in the world, these barriers currently place more than 5 million children who have experience the incarceration of a parent at risk of worse mental and physical health outcomes because of poor access to early health interventions. The study was published in Academic Pediatrics and authored by Drs. Rohan KhazanchiNia Heard-Garris, and Dr. Tyler Winkelman from Boston Children’s Hospital/Boston Medical Center, Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago, and Hennepin Healthcare, respectively. The researchers evaluated the relationships between having an incarcerated parent and health care use and access throughout childhood and adolescence. “While children and adolescents are living with their other parent or caregiver, parental incarceration can disrupt access to care for them through the loss of health insurance and fewer caregivers to help with responsibilities like routine healthcare visits,” explains Dr. Winkelman, the senior author of the study.

 
 

According to a new study, children exposed to parental incarceration had worse access to primary care and more unmet dental and mental health care needs than their peers, even after accounting for income, insurance status, rurality, and other important factors. With the United States having the highest incarceration rate in the world, these barriers currently place more than 5 million children who have experience the incarceration of a parent at risk of worse mental and physical health outcomes because of poor access to early health interventions. The study was published in Academic Pediatrics and authored by Drs. Rohan Khazanchi, Nia Heard-Garris, and Dr. Tyler Winkelman from Boston Children’s Hospital/Boston Medical Center, Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago, and Hennepin Healthcare, respectively. The researchers evaluated the relationships between having an incarcerated parent and health care use and access throughout childhood and adolescence. “While children and adolescents are living with their other parent or caregiver, parental incarceration can disrupt access to care for them through the loss of health insurance and fewer caregivers to help with responsibilities like routine healthcare visits,” explains Dr. Winkelman, the senior author of the study.

 
 

According to a new study, children exposed to parental incarceration had worse access to primary care and more unmet dental and mental health care needs than their peers, even after accounting for income, insurance status, rurality, and other important factors. With the United States having the highest incarceration rate in the world, these barriers currently place more than 5 million children who have experience the incarceration of a parent at risk of worse mental and physical health outcomes because of poor access to early health interventions. The study was published in Academic Pediatrics and authored by Drs. Rohan KhazanchiNia Heard-Garris, and Dr. Tyler Winkelman from Boston Children’s Hospital/Boston Medical Center, Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago, and Hennepin Healthcare, respectively. The researchers evaluated the relationships between having an incarcerated parent and health care use and access throughout childhood and adolescence. “While children and adolescents are living with their other parent or caregiver, parental incarceration can disrupt access to care for them through the loss of health insurance and fewer caregivers to help with responsibilities like routine healthcare visits,” explains Dr. Winkelman, the senior author of the study.

 
 

During the COVID-19 pandemic, transplantation of COVID-19 infected deceased donor kidneys gradually increased from 2020 to 2021 in the United States, before spiking in the first quarter of 2022, investigators revealed at Kidney Week 2022, the annual meeting of the American Society of Nephrology, in Orlando, Florida. Recipients of COVID-19 positive donor kidneys had no worse graft outcomes than other recipients. A total of 1731 (67.7%) COVID-19 positive kidneys were transplanted, 714 (27.9%) were recovered but not transplanted, and 108 (4.2%) were not recovered at all, Warren McKinney, PhD, of Hennepin Healthcare Research Institute, University of Minnesota in Minneapolis reported on behalf of his team. He told Renal & Urology News that “high discard rates for COVID-positive donors and greater cold ischemic times may suggest that such donor kidneys remain difficult to place. Patient- and transplant program-level interventions targeting decision support and risk aversion may be necessary to reduce discard rates for COVID-positive donor kidneys.” Co-investigator and Hennepin Healthcare Research Institute President, Ajay Israni, MD, MS, added: “Nephrologists should assure transplant candidates that a COVID-19 positive donor kidney can be acceptable. Patients should learn about the transplant center’s criteria for accepting COVID-19 positive donor kidneys at the time of listing, so that they’re not processing this information for the first time at kidney offering, when a rapid response is needed.”

 
 

October

Patients suffering a medical cardiac arrest stand a significantly better chance of surviving to discharge neurologically intact from a hospital if they receive a head and shoulder elevation approach to cardiopulmonary resuscitation – especially the if initial treatment using the new approach is started in less than 18 minutes after the 911 call for help is received, according to a new study. A clinical paper published in the scientific journal Resuscitation states that irrespective of initial cardiac rhythm, even Asystole/Pulseless Electrical Activity, ACE-CPR was associated with higher adjusted odds ratios of survival to hospital discharge relative to conventional supine CPR (C-CPR) when initiated within 18 minutes of the call. The researchers who are from HHRI and HHS are:

  1. Johanna C. Moore, MD, Hennepin Healthcare, Minneapolis, MN; University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN; Hennepin Healthcare Research Institute Minneapolis, MN
  2. Bayert Salverda, Hennepin Healthcare Research Institute Minneapolis, MN
  3. Paul Nystrom, MD, Hennepin Healthcare, Minneapolis, MN; Hennepin Healthcare, Minneapolis, MN
  4. Ryan Quinn, Hennepin Healthcare, Minneapolis, MN
  5. Keith G Lurie, MD, Hennepin Healthcare, Minneapolis, MN; University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN; Hennepin Healthcare Research Institute Minneapolis, MN
 
 

September

In their report, authors Nicholas S Roetker (Hennepin Healthcare Research Institute, Minneapolis, USA) and colleagues write that the risks of major bleeding, thrombosis, and cardiovascular events are elevated in patients receiving maintenance haemodialysis. The team’s objective was to compare the risk of these outcomes in haemodialysis patients according to the permanent vascular access type. Using data from the United States Renal Data System (2010–2015), the researchers included in their study patients with kidney failure who were greater than 18 years, had Medicare as the primary payer, were not using an oral anticoagulant, and were newly using an arteriovenous (AV) access for haemodialysis. The investigators acknowledge some limitations of their study, noting for example that the analysis included only patients with a functioning AV access, and that the scope of outcomes considered provides an “incomplete picture” of the risks facing AV access users. “While this analysis was primarily concerned with assessing bleeding, thrombotic, and cardiovascular events, the risk of a variety of other serious clinical outcomes should be considered when choosing a vascular access,” they write. Furthermore, the authors note that their study included Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries with Part D coverage who were not receiving oral anticoagulation; as such, they comments that “the results may not be generalisable to other kidney failure populations”.

 
 

August

Scientists have found that metformin, a commonly prescribed diabetes medication, lowers the odds of emergency department visits, hospitalizations, or death due to COVID-19 by over 40 percent; and over 50 percent if prescribed early in onset of symptoms. The study, which was published on August 18 in the New England Journal of Medicine, also found no positive effect from treatment with either ivermectin or low-dose fluvoxamine. The research was led by the University of Minnesota Medical School and School of Public Health along with others from Hennepin Healthcare and HHRI. “We are pleased to contribute to the body of knowledge around COVID-19 therapies in general, with treatments that are widely available. Our trial suggests that metformin may reduce the likelihood of needing to go to the emergency room or be hospitalized for COVID-19,” said Carolyn Bramante, MD, principal investigator of the study. The clinical trial launched in January 2021 after U of M Medical School scientists identified, through computer modeling and observational studies, that outpatient metformin use appeared to decrease the likelihood of mortality from, or being hospitalized for, COVID-19. Hennepin Healthcare was one of the participating clinical trial sites. Researchers included Mike Puskarich, MD, MS.

 

The Hennepin Healthcare Research Institute is evaluating an unusual methodology of quitting smoking by allowing participants to wager on themselves and put staunch money. It's miles a fraction of a label-unusual game called QuitBet, which is supported by a National Institutes of Health (NIH) analysis grant that is being administered by scientists at Hennepin Healthcare. Avid gamers wager $30 on themselves, which is added to the pot, and decide to stopping smoking for four weeks. After that, gamers in discovering a free breath checking out tool to video show their day-today development. All the gamers who accumulate been able to pause smoking on the tip divide the pot with the assorted winners, winning inspire their customary wager plus a profit. Most winners who stop smoking double their winnings. Scientific enhance is being given by Sandra Japuntich, Ph.D., a Hennepin Healthcare Investigator. “We’ve known for years that paying of us to alternate behaviors, is known as contingency management, works to wait on of us pause smoking. Alternatively, enforcing contingency management in a sustainable methodology is refined. QuitBet solves this by having players self-fund their very delight in incentives,” acknowledged Dr. Japuntich.

 
 

July

Among permanent vascular access options for hemodialysis, arteriovenous grafts carry a higher risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE), including deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, compared with arteriovenous fistulas. Using information from the 2010-2015 US Renal Data System, investigators compared 17,763 new recipients of arteriovenous grafts and 60,329 recipients of arteriovenous fistulas. Over 3 years, 10.8 vs 5.3 VTE events per 100 person-years occurred in the arteriovenous grafts vs arteriovenous fistulas groups, respectively. After adjustment for potential confounders, arteriovenous grafts were significantly associated with a 74% higher risk for VTE compared with arteriovenous fistulas, Nicholas S. Roetker, PhD, MS, of Hennepin Healthcare Research Institute in Minneapolis, Minnesota, and colleagues reported in Kidney Medicine.

 

Compared with the use of an arteriovenous fistula, the use of an arteriovenous graft in dialysis is associated with an increased risk of venous thromboembolism, according to data published in Kidney Medicine. “Compared with the general population, patients with kidney failure receiving maintenance hemodialysis face higher risks of both bleeding and thrombosis,” Nicholas S. Roetker, PhD, MS, from the Chronic Kidney Disease Research Group at Hennepin Healthcare Research Institute in Minnesota, and colleagues wrote. They added, “Although an arteriovenous (AV) fistula is generally preferred to an AV graft to minimize vascular access complications, given recent guidelines suggesting tailoring the access type to the clinical circumstances of each patient, a better understanding of the risks of bleeding, thrombosis, and other cardiovascular endpoints could help guide the choice of the type of permanent AV access.” Researchers identified 10.8 venous thromboembolism events per 100 person-years among patients using AV grafts, whereas 5.3 venous thromboembolism events per 100 person-years occurred among patients using AV fistulas. Therefore, the use of AV grafts in hemodialysis correlated with an increased risk of venous thromboembolism compared with AV fistulas. Additionally, analyses revealed AV graft use potentially correlated with an increased risk of cardiovascular death.

 

The Hennepin Healthcare Research Institute is studying the new method of quitting smoking by allowing participants to play a game, called QuitBet. It is quite simple – bet on yourself and win money if you could successfully stay away from cigarettes. The participants can place of bet of $30 on themselves and win the money back, along with a profit if they could manage to refrain from smoking for at least four weeks. The money collected from the participants will be added to a pot and it will be divided among the winners at the end of that period. Most participants who quit smoking will get double the amount they invested. This innovative game was developed by WayBetter. It was part of a series of "serious games" funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) aimed at improving people's health and lifestyle in a fun way. Other such games include DietBet, a weight loss game, and StepBet, which will track your steps. The NIH has provided $1.15 million for the QuitBet research. "We've known for years that paying people to change behaviors, known as contingency management, works to help people stop smoking. However, implementing contingency management in a sustainable way is difficult. QuitBet solves this by having players self-fund their own incentives," said Sandra Japuntich, Ph.D., a Hennepin Healthcare investigator who was part of the study.

 

The Hennepin Healthcare Research Institute is studying the new method of quitting smoking by allowing participants to play a game, called QuitBet. It is quite simple – bet on yourself and win money if you could successfully stay away from cigarettes. The participants can place of bet of $30 on themselves and win the money back, along with a profit if they could manage to refrain from smoking for at least four weeks. The money collected from the participants will be added to a pot and it will be divided among the winners at the end of that period. Most participants who quit smoking will get double the amount they invested. This innovative game was developed by WayBetter. It was part of a series of "serious games" funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) aimed at improving people's health and lifestyle in a fun way. Other such games include DietBet, a weight loss game, and StepBet, which will track your steps. The NIH has provided $1.15 million for the QuitBet research. "We've known for years that paying people to change behaviors, known as contingency management, works to help people stop smoking. However, implementing contingency management in a sustainable way is difficult. QuitBet solves this by having players self-fund their own incentives," said Sandra Japuntich, Ph.D., a Hennepin Healthcare investigator who was part of the study.

 

The Hennepin Healthcare Research Institute is evaluating a novel method of quitting smoking by allowing participants to wager on themselves and earn real money. It is a part of a brand-new game called QuitBet, which is supported by a National Institutes of Health (NIH) research grant that is being administered by scientists at Hennepin Healthcare. Players bet $30 on themselves, which is added to the pot, and commit to stopping smoking for four weeks. After that, players get a free breath testing device to monitor their daily progress. All of the players who were able to stop smoking at the end divide the pot with the other winners, winning back their original wager plus a profit. Most winners who give up smoking double their winnings. The principal investigator for the study is Jamie Rosen, founder and CEO of WayBetter. Scientific support is being given by Sandra Japuntich, Ph.D., a Hennepin Healthcare Investigator. The National Institutes of Health provided $1.15 million in funding to help the research. “We’ve known for years that paying people to change behaviors, known as contingency management, works to help people stop smoking. However, implementing contingency management in a sustainable way is difficult. QuitBet solves this by having players self-fund their own incentives,” said Dr. Japuntich.

 

June

Hennepin Healthcare Research Institute is testing this new innovative way to help people quit smoking by letting them bet on themselves and win real money. The new game is called QuitBet and it is being funded by a National Institutes of Health research grant. Players commit to quit smoking over four weeks and bet $30 on themselves, which goes into the pot. You then get a free breath testing device to track your daily progress. In the end, all the players who managed to quit smoking for the four weeks win their money back plus they split the pot with the other winners. They say winners typically double their money.

 

Minnesota cigarette smokers who are trying to quit the habit have the opportunity to bet on themselves and earn some cash in the process. The Hennepin Healthcare Research Institute, which oversees the medical research at Hennepin County Medical Center, is currently testing the new method to help people during that challenging process, called "QuitBet." It's a game funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) — features participants betting $30 on themselves to quit smoking over a four-week period. “We’ve known for years that paying people to change behaviors, known as contingency management, works to help people stop smoking. However, implementing contingency management in a sustainable way is difficult. QuitBet solves this by having players self-fund their own incentives,” said Dr. Sandra Japuntich, who is a Hennepin Healthcare investigator providing scientific support on the project.

 

May

Minnesota cigarette smokers who are trying to quit the habit have the opportunity to bet on themselves and earn some cash in the process. The Hennepin Healthcare Research Institute, which oversees the medical research at Hennepin County Medical Center, is currently testing the new method to help people during that challenging process, called "QuitBet." It's a game funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) — features participants betting $30 on themselves to quit smoking over a four-week period. “We’ve known for years that paying people to change behaviors, known as contingency management, works to help people stop smoking. However, implementing contingency management in a sustainable way is difficult. QuitBet solves this by having players self-fund their own incentives,” said Dr. Sandra Japuntich, who is a Hennepin Healthcare investigator providing scientific support on the project.

New game helps people to quit smoking. The game lets people bet on themselves and win real money, reveal researchers from Hennepin Healthcare Research Institute. It's part of a new game called QuitBet and it's being funded by a National Institutes of Health (NIH) research grant administered by researchers at Hennepin Healthcare. Jamie Rosen, WayBetter's founder and CEO, is the Principal Investigator of the study. Sandra Japuntich, PhD, a Hennepin Healthcare Investigator, is providing scientific support. The study was funded with $1.15 million from the National Institutes of Health. "We've known for years that paying people to change behaviors, known as contingency management, works to help people stop smoking. However, implementing contingency management in a sustainable way is difficult. QuitBet solves this by having players self-fund their own incentives," said Dr. Japuntich.

Michael Culhane had messed up in an EMT practice exercise, and his trainer was letting him know it. There is a cadence and order to the questions that medics ask on emergency scenes, and the 47-year-old firefighter had scrambled them. The criticism was harsh and true, and Culhane was happy to hear it. After nine months in COVID-19 recovery — after receiving overwhelming support to sit up, then stand, then walk again — he wasn't getting sympathy points here. Culhane shared his recovery story this week after returning to HCMC in Minneapolis to thank the caregivers who helped save his life — people he didn't really recognize because he was in a sedated coma during his three-month hospitalization. Culhane was placed on a ventilator at HCMC. His oxygen levels would improve when rolled onto his stomach but plummet when returned to his back. He was recommended for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, or ECMO, a bypass machine that filters blood when the lungs can't keep pace. The death rate of COVID-19 patients on ECMO is 47%, according to an international registry, but Culhane was running out of options. "He was frankly lucky that his body responded the way it did," said Dr. Matthew Prekker, an HCMC critical care specialist.

The Hennepin Healthcare Research Institute is testing an innovative way to help people quit smoking – by allowing them to bet on themselves and win real money. It is part of a new game called QuitBet and is funded by a National Institutes of Health (NIH) research grant administered by researchers at Hennepin Healthcare. Players commit to quit smoking over four weeks and bet $30 on themselves that goes into the pot. Players will then receive a free breath test device to track their progress each day. In the end, all players who managed to quit will win back their stake and a win as they share the pot with the other winners. Winners usually double their money when they quit smoking. Jamie Rosen, founder and CEO of WayBetter, is the lead investigator on the study. Sandra Japuntich Ph.D., a Hennepin Healthcare Investigator, provides scientific support. The study received $1.15 million in funding from the National Institutes of Health. “We’ve known for years that paying people for behavior changes, known as emergency management, helps them quit smoking. However, it is difficult to implement emergency management in a sustainable manner. QuitBet solves this problem by allowing players to self-fund their own incentives,” said Dr. Japuntich.

Read the story on Fior Reports.

Hennepin Healthcare Research Institute is testing an innovative way to help people quit smoking – by letting them bet on themselves and win real money. It's part of a new game called QuitBet and it's being funded by a National Institutes of Health (NIH) research grant administered by researchers at Hennepin Healthcare. Players commit to quit smoking over four weeks and bet $30 on themselves, which goes into the pot. Players then receive a free breath testing device to track their progress every day. At the end, all the players who have managed to quit win back their bet plus a profit as they split the pot with the other winners. Winners typically double their money while quitting smoking. Jamie Rosen, WayBetter's founder and CEO, is the Principal Investigator of the study. Sandra Japuntich Ph.D., a Hennepin Healthcare Investigator, is providing scientific support. The study was funded with $1.15 million from the National Institutes of Health. "We've known for years that paying people to change behaviors, known as contingency management, works to help people stop smoking. However, implementing contingency management in a sustainable way is difficult. QuitBet solves this by having players self-fund their own incentives," said Dr. Japuntich.

Read the story on Best Health Article.

Hennepin Healthcare Research Institute is testing an innovative way to help people quit smoking – by letting them bet on themselves and win real money. It’s part of a new game called QuitBet and it’s being funded by a National Institutes of Health (NIH) research grant administered by researchers at Hennepin Healthcare. Players commit to quit smoking over four weeks and bet $30 on themselves, which goes into the pot. Players then receive a free breath testing device to track their progress every day. At the end, all the players who have managed to quit win back their bet plus a profit as they split the pot with the other winners. Winners typically double their money while quitting smoking. Jamie Rosen, WayBetter’s founder and CEO, is the Principal Investigator of the study. Sandra Japuntich Ph.D., a Hennepin Healthcare Investigator, is providing scientific support. The study was funded with $1.15 million from the National Institutes of Health.

Read the story on ScienMag Science Magazine.

Hennepin Healthcare Research Institute is testing an innovative way to help people quit smoking – by letting them bet on themselves and win real money. It's part of a new game called QuitBet and it's being funded by a National Institutes of Health (NIH) research grant administered by researchers at Hennepin Healthcare. Jamie Rosen, WayBetter's founder and CEO, is the Principal Investigator of the study. Sandra Japuntich Ph.D., a Hennepin Healthcare Investigator, is providing scientific support. The study was funded with $1.15 million from the National Institutes of Health.

Read the story on News Medical Life Sciences.

The Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients (SRTR) held a consensus conference in 2012 that examined methods used by SRTR for constructing performance metrics and made recommendations on how to improve program-specific reports. During the subsequent decade, SRTR has implemented most of these recommendations; these are described in this article along with plans for another consensus conference in 2022. 

Read the article on  Physician's Weekly

HHRI Researcher, Sandra Japuntich, PhD, LP, was on WCCO 830-AM radio. Dr. Japuntich was interviewed about her woman-led cancer research where she talked about the American Cancer Society’s ResearcHERS initiative to get more women involved in cancer research. 

 

Listen to the interview on WCCO News Talk 830. Dr. Japuntich’s interview starts at about 20:45.

Healthcare insurance in the U.S. can be spotty, even with expansion of coverage under the Affordable Care Act. One of the remaining problem areas is coverage for people who are leaving prison or jail. In nonfederal cases, state and county governments pay for healthcare during the period people are incarcerated. But once they are released, there is often a gap before they get signed up for coverage by Medicaid or another payer. For people with chronic health conditions, that gap can lead to medical conditions getting out of control and acute episodes that lead to hospitalization or premature death. The federal Medicaid Reentry Act of 2021 is designed to remedy the situation. Currently, Medicaid programs are explicitly prohibited from covering incarcerated individuals. The proposed law would permit Medicaid to cover people starting 30 days before they are to be released. Advocates and public health officials say that would mean a smoother transition and increase the chances that recently incarcerated people will receive the medical services they need. But the Reentry Act could have some unintended consequences. Utsha Khatri, M.D., of the Institute for Heath Equity Research at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York and Tyler N.A. Winkelman, M.D., M.Sc., of the Health, Homelessness, and Criminal Justice Lab at the Hennepin Healthcare Research Institute in Minneapolis outlined a few of the consequences in an opinion piece published in April in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Read the story on Managed Healthcare Executive.

Label-concordant dosing may benefit patients on dialysis with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation more than below-label dosing, according to data published in the American Journal of Kidney Diseases. Further, warfarin correlated with an increased risk of bleeding compared with apixaban among this patient population. “Some patients on dialysis who have atrial fibrillation receive apixaban for stroke prevention at a dose below that indicated by the official drug label to reduce adverse bleeding events,” James B. Wetmore, MD, MS, of the chronic disease research group at the Hennepin Healthcare Research Institute in Minnesota, and colleagues wrote. They added, “Given controversy about apixaban dosing in dialysis, we used data from the United States Renal Data System (USRDS) to examine the effectiveness and safety of apixaban based on whether it was dosed in accordance with its U.S. FDA label (5 mg twice daily) or off-label at a lower dose (2.5 mg twice daily, when 5 mg was actually indicated).”

Read the story and watch the video on Healio.

April

Eric D. Weinhandl, PhD, MS, talks about the hidden costs in helping patients transition from peritoneal dialysis to home hemodialysis. “Increasing use of peritoneal dialysis (PD) will likely lead to increasing numbers of patients transitioning from PD to hemodialysis (HD),” Weinhandl, an epidemiologist at the Hennepin Healthcare Research Institute in Minneapolis at the time the research was completed, and colleagues wrote in a poster presented at the meeting. Researchers used the U.S. Renal Data System to identify patients aged 12 years and older who were newly diagnosed with end-stage kidney disease from 2001 through 2017.

Read the story and watch the video on Healio.

Hennepin Healthcare Research Institute (HHRI) announced that Warren McKinney, PhD, has been named HHRI’s VP for Equity in Research. In this role, he also joins the HHRI Board of Directors and the institute’s executive leadership team. Hennepin Healthcare is a UMN CTSA hub partner. Dr. McKinney completed CTSI’s Translational Research and Career Training (TRACT) program as a postdoctoral fellow and then went on to join the Minnesota Learning Health System Mentored Career Development Program, a K12 scholar training program at the University of Minnesota. To Dr. McKinney, CTSI has played a key role in his career. Dr. McKinney will lead the work across the Hennepin Healthcare System to connect efforts to improve health equity, define and drive strategy, and advocate for resources to build equity-focused, community-engaged research. 

 

Read the story on CTSI.

February

Tyler Winkelman, MD, MSc, provided KSTP with information from the Minnesota Department of Health (MDH) and the partnership with Hennepin Healthcare Research Institute (HHRI) and the Minnesota EHR Consortium for its story about service agencies using incentives to encourage people experiencing homelessness to get vaccinated. “The latest numbers from MDH and the Minnesota EHR Consortium show 13,246 people statewide have recently utilized a homelessness program. Of that, MDH says 5,749 people have received at least one vaccine shot, and 1,589 have received a booster, as of Feb. 5.”

 

Watch or read the story on KSTP.

A recently published study offers insight into what is being done differently at practices where patients express high trust in their clinicians and where clinicians trust their organizations. The study, published in Annals of Family Medicine, found there are four cultural variables in trusted organizations. “The emphasis on organizational culture is not an area that gets a lot of attention, but at least from these data, it’s an incredibly powerful variable that organizations should think more about,” said Mark Linzer, MD, lead author of the study, “Where Trust Flourishes: Perceptions of Clinicians Who Trust Their Organizations and Are Trusted by Their Patients.” Dr. Linzer directs the Institute for Professional Worklife and is vice chair of the medicine department at Hennepin Healthcare in Minneapolis.

Read the story on AMA.

January

Tackling the opioid crisis requires changing strategies and the way we think about addiction, says Columbia University professor Sandra Comer. That search led to a new type of treatment — a vaccine that targets the chemical makeup of oxycodone. Comer and her research colleague, Marco Pravetoni, are testing the vaccine on volunteers with substance use disorder. Dr. Pravatoni began work on the opioid vaccine when he was an investigator at the Hennepin Healthcare Research Institute (HHRI). Dr. Pravetoni left HHRI and joined the University of Minnesota in the fall of 2018. He was recently recruited from Minnesota to lead UW Medicine’s new Center for Medication Development for Substance Use Disorders.

Watch or read the story on CBS Evening News.

Dr. James Miner, chief of emergency medicine at Hennepin Healthcare and HHRI investigator, says hospitals are busier than they've ever been.

Watch the story on KARE-11.

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