Skip to content

HHRI Media Coverage – 2021

HHRI Media Coverage – 2021

2021

December

More than 1 million COVID-19 cases have been diagnosed in Minnesota since the pandemic began in the state nearly 22 months ago. State health officials announced another 4,155 new cases Monday, bringing the total number of infections to 1,000,361. It has taken just 27 days for the state to add 100,000 new cases. The previous 100,000 took 26 days before that, making this one of the fastest-growing surges since late last year. Booster shots could slow the spread, according to a new study using Minnesota health records. The study, believed to be the largest of its kind to evaluate booster effectiveness in the United States, used patient medical records from 11 health systems that are part of the Minnesota Electronic Health Record Consortium, which was formed to conduct large-scale research. Researchers did not have access to private information about the patients. Tyler Winkelman, MD, MSc, Anne Murray, MD, MSc, and Peter Bodurtha are authors from HHRI on this study.

 

 

Read the articles on Star Tribune and MedRxiv.

Researchers identified four characteristics that were likely to improve a physician’s trust in their organization. “Trust is an intrinsic and critically important aspect of the health care workplace. Health care workers need to believe their workplaces will watch out for them, keep them safe and provide a work environment where they can provide high-quality care for their patients,” Mark Linzer, MD, a physician with Hennepin Healthcare in Minneapolis, told Healio Primary Care. Linzer and colleagues conducted an analysis of the Healthy Work Place Study, which was a randomized trial of workplace interventions designed to improve work conditions in 34 primary care clinics in the Midwestern and Eastern United States.

 

Read the article on Healio.

November

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to threaten the health of communities worldwide, and health care communities seek to administer COVID vaccines en masse, patients' trust in the medical profession has never been more important. Researchers from Hennepin Healthcare and the University of Minnesota, found that patients' trust in their clinicians is connected to specific aspects of culture of the organization, and the level of trust their clinicians have in the health organization in which they work. "Lack of trust in the medical profession has implications for patient care since research from past epidemics has shown that lack of trust decreases the likelihood of patients adhering to public health recommendations," Mark Linzer, MD, et al write. "It is critical to identify factors that will assist health systems to better understand how to create the most trust within their work environments."

 

Read the article on Upper Michigan's Source.

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to threaten the health of communities worldwide, and health care communities seek to administer COVID vaccines en masse, patients' trust in the medical profession has never been more important. Researchers from Hennepin Healthcare and the University of Minnesota, found that patients' trust in their clinicians is connected to specific aspects of culture of the organization, and the level of trust their clinicians have in the health organization in which they work. "Lack of trust in the medical profession has implications for patient care since research from past epidemics has shown that lack of trust decreases the likelihood of patients adhering to public health recommendations," Mark Linzer, MD, et al write. "It is critical to identify factors that will assist health systems to better understand how to create the most trust within their work environments."

 

Read the article on News Break.

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to threaten the health of communities worldwide, and health care communities seek to administer COVID vaccines en masse, patients' trust in the medical profession has never been more important. Researchers from Hennepin Healthcare and the University of Minnesota, found that patients' trust in their clinicians is connected to specific aspects of culture of the organization, and the level of trust their clinicians have in the health organization in which they work. "Lack of trust in the medical profession has implications for patient care since research from past epidemics has shown that lack of trust decreases the likelihood of patients adhering to public health recommendations," Mark Linzer, MD, et al write. "It is critical to identify factors that will assist health systems to better understand how to create the most trust within their work environments."

 
News Source: Spoke Software

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to threaten the health of communities worldwide, and health care communities seek to administer COVID vaccines en masse, patients' trust in the medical profession has never been more important. Researchers from Hennepin Healthcare and the University of Minnesota, found that patients' trust in their clinicians is connected to specific aspects of culture of the organization, and the level of trust their clinicians have in the health organization in which they work. "Lack of trust in the medical profession has implications for patient care since research from past epidemics has shown that lack of trust decreases the likelihood of patients adhering to public health recommendations," Mark Linzer, MD, et al write. "It is critical to identify factors that will assist health systems to better understand how to create the most trust within their work environments."

 
News Source: losco County News

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to threaten the health of communities worldwide, and health care communities seek to administer COVID vaccines en masse, patients' trust in the medical profession has never been more important. Researchers from Hennepin Healthcare and the University of Minnesota, found that patients' trust in their clinicians is connected to specific aspects of culture of the organization, and the level of trust their clinicians have in the health organization in which they work. "Lack of trust in the medical profession has implications for patient care since research from past epidemics has shown that lack of trust decreases the likelihood of patients adhering to public health recommendations," Mark Linzer, MD, et al write. "It is critical to identify factors that will assist health systems to better understand how to create the most trust within their work environments."

 
News Source: Yahoo Finance.

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to threaten the health of communities worldwide, and health care communities seek to administer COVID vaccines en masse, patients' trust in the medical profession has never been more important. Researchers from Hennepin Healthcare and the University of Minnesota, found that patients' trust in their clinicians is connected to specific aspects of culture of the organization, and the level of trust their clinicians have in the health organization in which they work. "Lack of trust in the medical profession has implications for patient care since research from past epidemics has shown that lack of trust decreases the likelihood of patients adhering to public health recommendations," Mark Linzer, MD, et al write. "It is critical to identify factors that will assist health systems to better understand how to create the most trust within their work environments."

 

Read the article on NBC 12 News.

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to threaten the health of communities worldwide, and health care communities seek to administer COVID vaccines en masse, patients' trust in the medical profession has never been more important. Researchers from Hennepin Healthcare and the University of Minnesota, found that patients' trust in their clinicians is connected to specific aspects of culture of the organization, and the level of trust their clinicians have in the health organization in which they work. "Lack of trust in the medical profession has implications for patient care since research from past epidemics has shown that lack of trust decreases the likelihood of patients adhering to public health recommendations," Mark Linzer, MD, et al write. "It is critical to identify factors that will assist health systems to better understand how to create the most trust within their work environments."

 

News Source: KOLD News 13.

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to threaten the health of communities worldwide, and health care communities seek to administer COVID vaccines en masse, patients' trust in the medical profession has never been more important. Researchers from Hennepin Healthcare and the University of Minnesota, found that patients' trust in their clinicians is connected to specific aspects of culture of the organization, and the level of trust their clinicians have in the health organization in which they work. "Lack of trust in the medical profession has implications for patient care since research from past epidemics has shown that lack of trust decreases the likelihood of patients adhering to public health recommendations," Mark Linzer, MD, et al write. "It is critical to identify factors that will assist health systems to better understand how to create the most trust within their work environments."

 

News Source: WCJB.

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to threaten the health of communities worldwide, and health care communities seek to administer COVID vaccines en masse, patients' trust in the medical profession has never been more important. Researchers from Hennepin Healthcare and the University of Minnesota, found that patients' trust in their clinicians is connected to specific aspects of culture of the organization, and the level of trust their clinicians have in the health organization in which they work. "Lack of trust in the medical profession has implications for patient care since research from past epidemics has shown that lack of trust decreases the likelihood of patients adhering to public health recommendations," Mark Linzer, MD, et al write. "It is critical to identify factors that will assist health systems to better understand how to create the most trust within their work environments."

 

News Source: WCAX.

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to threaten the health of communities worldwide, and health care communities seek to administer COVID vaccines en masse, patients' trust in the medical profession has never been more important. Researchers from Hennepin Healthcare and the University of Minnesota, found that patients' trust in their clinicians is connected to specific aspects of culture of the organization, and the level of trust their clinicians have in the health organization in which they work. "Lack of trust in the medical profession has implications for patient care since research from past epidemics has shown that lack of trust decreases the likelihood of patients adhering to public health recommendations," Mark Linzer, MD, et al write. "It is critical to identify factors that will assist health systems to better understand how to create the most trust within their work environments."

 

Read the article on WDTV.

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to threaten the health of communities worldwide, and health care communities seek to administer COVID vaccines en masse, patients' trust in the medical profession has never been more important. Researchers from Hennepin Healthcare and the University of Minnesota, found that patients' trust in their clinicians is connected to specific aspects of culture of the organization, and the level of trust their clinicians have in the health organization in which they work. "Lack of trust in the medical profession has implications for patient care since research from past epidemics has shown that lack of trust decreases the likelihood of patients adhering to public health recommendations," Mark Linzer, MD, et al write. "It is critical to identify factors that will assist health systems to better understand how to create the most trust within their work environments."

 

Read the article on KPLC 7 News.

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to threaten the health of communities worldwide, and health care communities seek to administer COVID vaccines en masse, patients' trust in the medical profession has never been more important. Researchers from Hennepin Healthcare and the University of Minnesota, found that patients' trust in their clinicians is connected to specific aspects of culture of the organization, and the level of trust their clinicians have in the health organization in which they work. "Lack of trust in the medical profession has implications for patient care since research from past epidemics has shown that lack of trust decreases the likelihood of patients adhering to public health recommendations," Mark Linzer, MD, et al write. "It is critical to identify factors that will assist health systems to better understand how to create the most trust within their work environments."

 

Read the article on KLTV 7.

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to threaten the health of communities worldwide, and health care communities seek to administer COVID vaccines en masse, patients' trust in the medical profession has never been more important. Researchers from Hennepin Healthcare and the University of Minnesota, found that patients' trust in their clinicians is connected to specific aspects of culture of the organization, and the level of trust their clinicians have in the health organization in which they work. "Lack of trust in the medical profession has implications for patient care since research from past epidemics has shown that lack of trust decreases the likelihood of patients adhering to public health recommendations," Mark Linzer, MD, et al write. "It is critical to identify factors that will assist health systems to better understand how to create the most trust within their work environments."

 

Read the article on NewsChannel 10.

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to threaten the health of communities worldwide, and health care communities seek to administer COVID vaccines en masse, patients' trust in the medical profession has never been more important. Researchers from Hennepin Healthcare and the University of Minnesota, found that patients' trust in their clinicians is connected to specific aspects of culture of the organization, and the level of trust their clinicians have in the health organization in which they work. "Lack of trust in the medical profession has implications for patient care since research from past epidemics has shown that lack of trust decreases the likelihood of patients adhering to public health recommendations," Mark Linzer, MD, et al write. "It is critical to identify factors that will assist health systems to better understand how to create the most trust within their work environments."

 

Read the article on Web Center Fairbanks.

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to threaten the health of communities worldwide, and health care communities seek to administer COVID vaccines en masse, patients' trust in the medical profession has never been more important. Researchers from Hennepin Healthcare and the University of Minnesota, found that patients' trust in their clinicians is connected to specific aspects of culture of the organization, and the level of trust their clinicians have in the health organization in which they work. "Lack of trust in the medical profession has implications for patient care since research from past epidemics has shown that lack of trust decreases the likelihood of patients adhering to public health recommendations," Mark Linzer, MD, et al write. "It is critical to identify factors that will assist health systems to better understand how to create the most trust within their work environments."

 

Read the article on NBC Nebraska Scottsbluff.

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to threaten the health of communities worldwide, and health care communities seek to administer COVID vaccines en masse, patients' trust in the medical profession has never been more important. Researchers from Hennepin Healthcare and the University of Minnesota, found that patients' trust in their clinicians is connected to specific aspects of culture of the organization, and the level of trust their clinicians have in the health organization in which they work. "Lack of trust in the medical profession has implications for patient care since research from past epidemics has shown that lack of trust decreases the likelihood of patients adhering to public health recommendations," Mark Linzer, MD, et al write. "It is critical to identify factors that will assist health systems to better understand how to create the most trust within their work environments."

 

Read the article on FOX 8.

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to threaten the health of communities worldwide, and health care communities seek to administer COVID vaccines en masse, patients' trust in the medical profession has never been more important. Researchers from Hennepin Healthcare and the University of Minnesota, found that patients' trust in their clinicians is connected to specific aspects of culture of the organization, and the level of trust their clinicians have in the health organization in which they work. "Lack of trust in the medical profession has implications for patient care since research from past epidemics has shown that lack of trust decreases the likelihood of patients adhering to public health recommendations," Mark Linzer, MD, et al write. "It is critical to identify factors that will assist health systems to better understand how to create the most trust within their work environments."

 

Read the article on KWQC.

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to threaten the health of communities worldwide, and health care communities seek to administer COVID vaccines en masse, patients' trust in the medical profession has never been more important. Researchers from Hennepin Healthcare and the University of Minnesota, found that patients' trust in their clinicians is connected to specific aspects of culture of the organization, and the level of trust their clinicians have in the health organization in which they work. "Lack of trust in the medical profession has implications for patient care since research from past epidemics has shown that lack of trust decreases the likelihood of patients adhering to public health recommendations," Mark Linzer, MD, et al write. "It is critical to identify factors that will assist health systems to better understand how to create the most trust within their work environments."

 

Read the article on WMBF News.

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to threaten the health of communities worldwide, and health care communities seek to administer COVID vaccines en masse, patients' trust in the medical profession has never been more important. Researchers from Hennepin Healthcare and the University of Minnesota, found that patients' trust in their clinicians is connected to specific aspects of culture of the organization, and the level of trust their clinicians have in the health organization in which they work. "Lack of trust in the medical profession has implications for patient care since research from past epidemics has shown that lack of trust decreases the likelihood of patients adhering to public health recommendations," Mark Linzer, MD, et al write. "It is critical to identify factors that will assist health systems to better understand how to create the most trust within their work environments."

 

Read the article on FOX 19 Now.

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to threaten the health of communities worldwide, and health care communities seek to administer COVID vaccines en masse, patients' trust in the medical profession has never been more important. Researchers from Hennepin Healthcare and the University of Minnesota, found that patients' trust in their clinicians is connected to specific aspects of culture of the organization, and the level of trust their clinicians have in the health organization in which they work. "Lack of trust in the medical profession has implications for patient care since research from past epidemics has shown that lack of trust decreases the likelihood of patients adhering to public health recommendations," Mark Linzer, MD, et al write. "It is critical to identify factors that will assist health systems to better understand how to create the most trust within their work environments."

 

Read the article on KKCO 11 News.

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to threaten the health of communities worldwide, and health care communities seek to administer COVID vaccines en masse, patients' trust in the medical profession has never been more important. Researchers from Hennepin Healthcare and the University of Minnesota, found that patients' trust in their clinicians is connected to specific aspects of culture of the organization, and the level of trust their clinicians have in the health organization in which they work. "Lack of trust in the medical profession has implications for patient care since research from past epidemics has shown that lack of trust decreases the likelihood of patients adhering to public health recommendations," Mark Linzer, MD, et al write. "It is critical to identify factors that will assist health systems to better understand how to create the most trust within their work environments."

News Source: Yahoo

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to threaten the health of communities worldwide, and health care communities seek to administer COVID vaccines en masse, patients' trust in the medical profession has never been more important. Researchers from Hennepin Healthcare and the University of Minnesota, found that patients' trust in their clinicians is connected to specific aspects of culture of the organization, and the level of trust their clinicians have in the health organization in which they work. "Lack of trust in the medical profession has implications for patient care since research from past epidemics has shown that lack of trust decreases the likelihood of patients adhering to public health recommendations," Mark Linzer, MD, et al write. "It is critical to identify factors that will assist health systems to better understand how to create the most trust within their work environments."

 

Read the article on Suncoast View.

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to threaten the health of communities worldwide, and health care communities seek to administer COVID vaccines en masse, patients' trust in the medical profession has never been more important. Researchers from Hennepin Healthcare and the University of Minnesota, found that patients' trust in their clinicians is connected to specific aspects of culture of the organization, and the level of trust their clinicians have in the health organization in which they work. "Lack of trust in the medical profession has implications for patient care since research from past epidemics has shown that lack of trust decreases the likelihood of patients adhering to public health recommendations," Mark Linzer, MD, et al write. "It is critical to identify factors that will assist health systems to better understand how to create the most trust within their work environments."

 

Read the article on Hawaii News Now.

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to threaten the health of communities worldwide, and health care communities seek to administer COVID vaccines en masse, patients' trust in the medical profession has never been more important. Researchers from Hennepin Healthcare and the University of Minnesota, found that patients' trust in their clinicians is connected to specific aspects of culture of the organization, and the level of trust their clinicians have in the health organization in which they work. "Lack of trust in the medical profession has implications for patient care since research from past epidemics has shown that lack of trust decreases the likelihood of patients adhering to public health recommendations," Mark Linzer, MD, et al write. "It is critical to identify factors that will assist health systems to better understand how to create the most trust within their work environments."

 
News Source: Morningstar

Home dialysis use has been on the rise, with greater absolute growth occurring with peritoneal dialysis (PD) and greater relative growth observed with home hemodialysis (HHD), according to data presented during the American Society of Nephrology’s Kidney Week 2021. From 2016 to 2021, home dialysis use rose from 11.6% to 14.5%, Eric D. Weinhandl, PhD, MS, of Hennepin Healthcare Research Institute in Minneapolis, Minnesota, and colleagues reported. During that same period, HHD use increased from 1.57% to 2.31% and PD use increased from 10.0% to 12.2%.

 

Read the article on Renal & Urology News.

October

For many people in their 50s, 60s, and 70s, taking a low-dose aspirin has been part of their daily routine for decades. For people without cardiovascular disease, it has long been accepted that daily low-dose aspirin lowers the odds of having a first heart attack or stroke. The idea is so ingrained among the general public that millions take “baby” aspirin without consulting their physicians. But a proposed update to the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force guidelines will likely pull back the task force's 2016 recommendations and limit daily aspirin for prevention to a more restricted group. The biggest change in 2021 is that the latest science casts doubt about aspirin’s ability to prevent colon cancer. A lot of people are unaware of this aspect of the guidelines, but the 2016 Task Force considered aspirin’s effect on colon cancer to get a more complete picture of aspirin’s potential benefits. But the ASPREE trial, which enrolled people 70 years old or older, found during the five-year trial that colon cancer risk was higher with aspirin than without it. That said, the jury is still out regarding colon cancer—any benefits of aspirin in clinical trial participants will likely take 10 or 20 more years to come to light. This means that in the future, these guidelines may change again. HHRI researcher Anne Murray, MD, MSc, is Co-PI on the ASPREE trial. 

 

For many people in their 50s, 60s, and 70s, taking a low-dose aspirin has been part of their daily routine for decades. For people without cardiovascular disease, it has long been accepted that daily low-dose aspirin lowers the odds of having a first heart attack or stroke. The idea is so ingrained among the general public that millions take “baby” aspirin without consulting their physicians. But a proposed update to the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force guidelines will likely pull back the task force's 2016 recommendations and limit daily aspirin for prevention to a more restricted group. The biggest change in 2021 is that the latest science casts doubt about aspirin’s ability to prevent colon cancer. A lot of people are unaware of this aspect of the guidelines, but the 2016 Task Force considered aspirin’s effect on colon cancer to get a more complete picture of aspirin’s potential benefits. But the ASPREE trial, which enrolled people 70 years old or older, found during the five-year trial that colon cancer risk was higher with aspirin than without it. That said, the jury is still out regarding colon cancer—any benefits of aspirin in clinical trial participants will likely take 10 or 20 more years to come to light. This means that in the future, these guidelines may change again. HHRI researcher Anne Murray, MD, MSc, is Co-PI on the ASPREE trial. 

 

Read the story on Columbia University Irving Medical Center.

In Minnesota, people of color experience some of the worst health disparities in the U.S. The Center for Chronic Disease Reduction and Equity Promotion Across Minnesota, or C2DREAM, is a new research center led by Mayo Clinic and the University of Minnesota that aims to reduce these disparities in collaboration with Minnesota community leaders and community health organizations. "The C2DREAM research center will evaluate novel interventions designed to address structural and interpersonal racism as a fundamental cause of cardiovascular health disparities among people of color in rural and urban communities in Minnesota," says Christi Patten, Ph.D., a Mayo Clinic behavioral health researcher and co-principal investigator for C2DREAM. C2DREAM is a regional effort spanning Minnesota that includes Mayo Clinic, Southeast; Mayo Clinic Health System, South and Southwest; the University of Minnesota, Hennepin Healthcare, and Native American Community Clinic, Central and North; and the Rand Corp. It brings together researchers and community stakeholders from various disciplines, drawing on evidence-based medical expertise and local and cultural knowledge.

 

Read the article on Post Bulletin.

Rochester, Minn.-based Mayo Clinic and the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis have received a five-year, $19.4 million grant from the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities to create a research center aimed at reducing heart health disparities. The Center for Chronic Disease Reduction and Equity Promotion Across Minnesota will work with community partners to support clinical research on community and primary care approaches to diet, physical activity, smoking cessation and other factors related to heart health disparities. Additionally, the program will explore the root causes of health inequities, according to an Oct. 19 news release. 

 

Read the article on Becker's Hospital Review.

The University of Minnesota and Mayo Clinic have received a $19.4 million federal grant to start a new research center that will focus on racial disparities in cardiovascular health. The five-year grant from the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities will be used to support clinical research on community and primary care approaches to diet, physical activity, smoking cessation and other factors that impact heart health. Hennepin Healthcare Research Institute is among the organizations that will collaborate with the new research initiative.

 

Read the article on Star Tribune.

The University of Minnesota and Mayo Clinic have received a $19.4 million federal grant to start a new research center that will focus on racial disparities in cardiovascular health. The five-year grant from the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities will be used to support clinical research on community and primary care approaches to diet, physical activity, smoking cessation and other factors that impact heart health. Hennepin Healthcare and the Native American Community Clinic in south Minneapolis are among the organizations that will collaborate with the new research initiative.

 

Read the article on Yahoo Entertainment.

Research has shown the effectiveness of aspirin in the secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease among persons with a history of coronary heart disease. The evidence of primary prevention is less conclusive, despite some studies showing that aspirin reduces the incidence of cardiovascular events and possibly reduces the incidence of cancer and cancer-associated mortality. In this study, scientists conducted the Aspirin in Reducing Events in the Elderly (ASPREE) randomized, placebo-controlled trial across 34 sites in the United States and 16 sites in Australia. Trial subjects were community-dwelling men and women from Australia and the United States. A total of 19,114 persons were enrolled in the study, of whom 9,525 were randomly assigned to receive aspirin. The participants were 70 years of age or older (≥65 years of age for blacks and Hispanics in the U.S.) and were free of any chronic illness. White participants comprised 91% of the study cohort. Additionally, 56.4% of the participants were women and 11.0% reported previous regular aspirin use. HHRI researcher Anne Murray, MD, MSc, is Co-PI on the ASPREE trial. 

 

Read the article on News Medical Life Science.

September

The number of patients starting treatment for end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) in the US dropped sharply during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, with the most pronounced decline occurring among individuals aged 75 years or older, according to a new study. “The abrupt decline in documented ESKD incidence is unprecedented: the approximately 2200 persons per week known to reach ESKD during the initial height of the pandemic has not been observed since 2011,” James B. Wetmore, MD, MS, of the Chronic Disease Research Group, Hennepin Healthcare Research Institute, Minneapolis, Minnesota, and colleagues reported in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. During the initial height of the pandemic (epidemiologic weeks 15-18; April 2020), the documented incidence of ESKD decreased by 25% overall and 31% among those aged 75 years or older compared with corresponding periods in 2017-2019.

 

Read the article on Renal & Urology News.

zAmya Theater brings people with (and without) experience around homelessness together around theater, community, advocacy and social justice. For this production, zAmya worked with Dr. Kate Diaz Vickery Diabetes + Homelessness Research Team from Hennepin Healthcare Research Institute. They did a staged reading of the play at the Capri Theatre in North Minneapolis. Dr. Vickery has been working on research and prevention of diabetes, especially with people experiencing homelessness for many years. Her team went to a zAmya production before the pandemic and a lightbulb popped. She realized that theatre might be an effective way to get the message to the target market. The show was much more engaging and memorable than a brochure.

 

Read the article on Mostly Minnesota.

August

Imagine you’ve been on a waiting list for a new liver for years. When you learned you would need an organ transplant, your head was spinning. You were sent to a transplant center, where you underwent a lengthy evaluation process to determine your eligibility to be placed on the waiting list for a new liver. Three and a half years later, your phone rings in the middle of the night. It’s your transplant center, calling to offer you a liver! Finally, the moment you’ve been waiting for. But wait — the nurse coordinator on the other end of the line is explaining that the organ you’re being offered came from someone who died of a drug overdose, although test results don’t show any signs of infection. “The current process for matching an organ to a patient isn’t very patient-friendly,” says Cory Schaffhausen, PhD, a researcher at Hennepin Healthcare Research Institute, assistant professor at University of Minnesota Medical School, and human-centered design engineer at the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients (SRTR), a data registry located at Hennepin Healthcare that analyzes outcomes for organ transplant donors and recipients across the U.S. He set out to change that in 2020 with his research and design project, Embedding Human-Centered Design and Learning Health System Research in the Transplantation System.

 

Read the story on UMN.

Things have looked up for U.S. kidney transplant recipients over the past few decades, according to a review article. In adult kidney transplant recipients, the total number of transplants from living and deceased donors in the U.S. jumped from 45,008 in 1996-1999 up to 76,885 in 2016-2019, reported Sundaram Hariharan, MD, of the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, and colleagues. This uptick was largely driven by a rise in the number of transplants from deceased kidney donors, from 29,823 in 1996 to 53,139 in 2019, they stated in the New England Journal of Medicine.

 

Read the article on MedPage Today.

An ongoing COVID-19 clinical trial studying the outpatient use of metformin, a generic medication for type 2 diabetes, has expanded and will now be the nation’s first to include fluvoxamine, an antidepressant, and ivermectin, an antiparasitic, as possible treatment options to prevent hospitalization and “long COVID.” Hennepin Healthcare in Minneapolis is a participating Clinical trial site.

 

Read the article on The Gilmer Mirror.

The University Hospital Center for Advanced Liver Diseases and Transplantation program was rated the top program for the second consecutive evaluation period for one-year survival rates in the Tri-state area by the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients. The program led by Rutgers New Jersey Medical School physicians has an estimated one-year survival rate of nearly 99 percent. Since 1989, the center for Advanced Liver Diseases and Transplantation has completed more than 1,500 liver transplant surgeries. In the past two years, the center performed over 80 transplants. The Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients is a federally supported program for organ transplantation in the country. It is operated by the Chronic Disease Research Group and is a division of the Hennepin Healthcare Research Institute

 

Read the article on Tap into Newark.

For the second consecutive evaluation period, the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients (SRTR) has rated the liver transplant program at Newark’s University Hospital Center for Advanced Liver Diseases and Transplantation, as the regional leader in one-year survival rates. The Center is led by the nationally-recognized physicians at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School. With an estimated one-year survival rate of 98.75%, the Center was rated as one of the top centers from all hospitals in the New York Tri-State area of New Jersey, New York and Connecticut. The SRTR, operated by the Chronic Disease Research Group, a division of the Hennepin Healthcare Research Institute, is a federally supported program. Evaluations of liver transplant programs are released twice a year, in January and July.

 

Read the article on New Jersey Business.

July

The number of patients receiving treatment for end-stage kidney disease in April was 0.6% lower than a year ago, the first such year-to-year drop in patient census since 1980, a new study shows. “Between week 1 of 2015 and week 13 of 2020, the numbers of dialysis and transplant patients steadily increased, with little deviation from quadratic trends,” Eric D. Weinhandl, PhD, MS, and colleagues from the Chronic Disease Research Group at the Hennepin Healthcare Research Institute in Minneapolis, wrote.

 

 

Read the article on Healio.

Black patients and patients with limited English language proficiency were more likely to get a COVID-19 test initiated in an in-person healthcare setting than via telehealth, according to data published in JAMA Network Open that emphasizes how social determinants of health affected COVID-19 testing access during the pandemic. The report, completed by researchers from the University of Minnesota and Hennepin Healthcare Research Institute (HHRI), particularly investigated health disparities in some of the emerging care access modalities made prominent by the COVID-19 crisis. This isn’t because getting an ED-based test is better or worse care; rather, the disparity likely stems from the already poor health experienced by the individual admitted for inpatient care. This demonstrates how barriers to various care access modalities can affect downstream health outcomes, according to Peter Bodurtha, a data scientist with HHRI who worked on the study.

The opioid epidemic led to a record number of drug overdoses in the United States last year. The spike is happening in Minnesota, too. Just under 800 Minnesotans died from drug overdoses in 2019. More than 1,000 died last year — a 35% jump. When a lot of the world was shutting down due to the pandemic, the counselors at the Alliance Wellness Clinic in Bloomington stayed open to help people struggling with opioid addiction. Yussuf Shafie owns the clinic. Dr. Gavin Bart, an addiction medicine specialist at Hennepin Healthcare and HHRI researcher, says deadly overdoses from illicitly manufactured opiates like fentanyl are way up in Minnesota.

Read the story on CBS Minnesota

A recent study from researchers at the University of Minnesota and Hennepin Healthcare Research Institute (HHRI) is among the first to examine how different socio-demographic groups used telehealth, outpatient (i.e., clinic), emergency department and inpatient (i.e., hospital) care to test for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. Their findings were recently published in JAMA Network Open. The study was led by U of M School of Public Health along with others from Hennepin Healthcare and HHRI. Researchers included Tyler Winkelman, MD, MSc, and HHRI Data Scientist Peter Bodurtha. The team analyzed anonymous electronic health record data for people with symptoms of viral illness who received SARS-CoV-2 testing at Hennepin Healthcare, a large safety-net health system in Minneapolis. The researchers also added that the inequities could be partially explained by clinician and clinic variations in telehealth use. “Without structural reforms, rapid implementation of telehealth and other new services may exacerbate inequities in access to care, particularly if these investments come at the expense of other care sites,” said Bodurtha.

Read the article on UMN.

April

A Penn Medicine study found that Medicaid expansion helped increase access to medication for opioid use disorder, despite some existing limitations to widespread access. The study, led by Perelman School of Medicine fellow Utsha Khatri, found that Medicaid expansion correlates to significant improvements in accessing medication for OUD. Previous clinical studies have found that medications for opioid use disorder result in more effective outcomes for retention in treatment, reduced illicit opioid use, decreased opioid-related overdose rates, and serious acute care. “Medicaid alone will not entirely close gaps in care between people with and without criminal justice involvement. Additional work is needed to understand key drivers of the persistent disparities we identified,” senior author Tyler Winkelman, Co-Director of the Health, Homelessness, and Criminal Justice lab at the Hennepin Healthcare Research Institute, told Penn Medicine News. 

Read the article on The Daily Pennsylvanian.

March

A record number of Hennepin County residents fatally overdosed from opioids or methamphetamines last year, with an alarming spike in deaths from fentanyl, a powerful synthetic painkiller that can be lethal even in tiny doses. Hennepin County recorded 285 opioid-related deaths for the year, with nearly all involving at least trace amounts of fentanyl. That is up from 170 opioid deaths the year before. Methamphetamine overdoses reached a record 116 in the county last year. Methamphetamine use surged during the pandemic because the drug is more accessible and cheaper to buy, said Dr. Tyler Winkelman, a physician who treats inmates with substance abuse issues at the Hennepin County jail. With opioid and methamphetamine abuse worsening in Hennepin County, COVID-19 has scared people away from seeking treatment, he said.

 

Read the article on Star Tribune.

input search string and hit enter